Shillong

The city was very chilly – even in October. It sent shivers through my bones even though it wasn’t snowing. I couldn’t tell if that was due to the altitude or due to the fact that I spent most of my time in the open. I had the best time walking around without a jacket in the teeth chattering cold.

I was in Shillong with a group of colleagues from work and we stayed the night at an amazing guest house in Shillong, booked by our clients. Our first destination was Cherrapunji – the rainiest place on planet earth, where we saw one of the highest waterfalls in India.

Cherrapunjee: The rainiest place on earth
Cherrapunjee: The rainiest place on earth

 

Waterfall at Cherrapunjee
Waterfall at Cherrapunjee

We went through villages with moss growing on the stones, ferns jutting out from boulders capped with small, beautiful houses created entirely of wood and stone. Scotland of the east, it most definitely was. And the local populace with their early adoption of both the English language and Christianity seem to have strived to keep the place just like what Scotland might be.

Brooks that run under pretty little bridges joining the highway to the small villages across the Khasi hills. Aunts of the Khasi tribe chewing betel leaves and nuts – lots of them losing their teeth due to the same.

Near Shillong
Near Shillong

We also visited Mawsmai caves before heading back to the Elephant Falls in Shillong.

Elephant Falls in Shillong
Elephant Falls in Shillong

The falls were originally named the Three Step waterfalls by the Khasi people because the water falls in to three steps. The British though named it as the Elephant Falls because on the left side of the falls there was a rock that resembled an elephant. Unfortunately the rock was destroyed by earthquake in 1987, but the name stuck.

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